Saturday Program

Except where noted, all events will take place in the Cafritz Foundation Theatre on the second floor of the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center.


Continental Breakfast
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Location: Clarice Smith Center Faculty/Staff Lounge (up the stairs across the hall from the Cafritz Theatre, above the Starbucks)

Katherine Rodda and Donna Koh, <em>Helping Blind and Low Vision Music Students Thrive</em> Katherine Rodda and Donna Koh, Helping Blind and Low Vision Music Students Thrive
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How would you help students with visual impairments who cannot use print music in your library? Where would you find accessible materials that help instructors work with blind music students? As a music librarian, are you familiar with resources for blind and visually impaired students who are pursuing a degree in music? At the Music Section at the National Library Service (NLS) for the Blind and Print Disabled, we provide music reader services to patrons who are blind or have low vision. We have accessible books and recordings to help these patrons read, write, study, and enjoy music. We also work with college music librarians and professors in providing instrumental and vocal scores, theory books, and anthologies so that their students can better participate in their coursework, school performances, and in their preparation to be professional musicians. In our presentation, we will offer guidance for working with blind students, including discussions about braille music code, books that teach braille music reading, the NLS braille music collection, and other tools and resources that can help students with visual impairments learn. We will also go over some common challenges and pitfalls instructors and librarians face while working with this group of students. Librarians who are familiar with these resources and how to best serve this population will play a vital role in helping these students successfully complete their education and grow into competent professionals.

Susan Forscher Weiss, Darwin Scott, and Carla Bond, <em>Teaching the Materiality of Music: A Unique Alliance between Professors, Librarians, and Students </em> Susan Forscher Weiss, Darwin Scott, and Carla Bond, Teaching the Materiality of Music: A Unique Alliance between Professors, Librarians, and Students
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The planned and spontaneous collaboration that rocked my guest residency at Princeton University in 2019 was a truly memorable union of faculty, Princeton’s music librarian, other library staff, the spectacular holdings in the library’s rare book collection, and an impressive cadre of dedicated students. This presentation recounts why this seminar was a stunning learning experience and how the partnership offers a model for similar outcomes elsewhere Centered around new musicological currents addressing music’s materiality, the seminar concentrated on select manuscript and printed Renaissance music texts. Students documented textual changes affected by philosophical, theological, political, educational, and societal events and ideologies. They mined primary sources acquired over recent years and a number of fortuitous purchases made just before the course began. An undated print of Rore’s first book of madrigals inspired an entire class led by Jessie Ann Owens on partbook production in 16th-century Venice and how subtle differences between varying imprints of identical pieces inform scholarly discourse. Darwin Scott addressed how librarians acquire rare materials, form relationships with antiquarian vendors, and the vicissitudes of auction bids. Expanding perspectives beyond musical sources, a joint session with a course led by historian Anthony Grafton studying non-music manuscripts and prints exposed the material interconnections between both traditions during the Renaissance. The resulting archeology revealed patterns and influences stemming from earlier traditions, sister disciplines, and non-European cultures. The students recounted how the first-hand interaction with the actual sources opened their eyes to nuances impossible to detect in digital reproductions. Before the semester ended, they uncovered material that allowed for a breathtaking discovery.

Benjamin Jackson, <em> Re-examining  Collections Through Digital Storytelling</em> Benjamin Jackson, Re-examining Collections Through Digital Storytelling
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Conveying the scope of collections and holdings and engaging the widest range of users has always been a vexing, primary concern for those working in libraries of all disciplines. In this presentation, I consider how open-source platforms have made digital storytelling an effective and increasingly accessible means for those in libraries to connect and contextualize their materials with a broad audience. Being employed as a project archivist hired to work with the Keesing Collection on Popular Music and Culture at Special Collections in Performing Arts, University of Maryland, College Park I have had the fairly unique opportunity to undertake digital humanities projects to encourage research with the collections. My most recent project has been to develop online exhibits exploring our new holdings that focus on the intersections between popular music and the major conflicts in which the United States was a combatant in the twentieth century. While I consider myself engaged in the sphere of digital humanities, my relative lack of experience in most kind of scripting and coding at first discouraged me from attempting anything outside of an article or exhibit-style approach to presenting the collection. With the rapid expansion of open-source projects, elements like flowing timelines and interactive charts and graphs are now far less time-consuming to make and dependent on a deep knowledge of web design. These tools were used in the Keeping project to consider issues like how the vocabulary of American songwriters during the Second World War changed by year or how the relative popularity of songs addressing Vietnam was reflected in the pop charts over the course of the conflict. In presenting this case-study alongside general discussion of digital storytelling for music libraries I hope to highlight some of the opportunities these platforms afford to engage new and expanding populations

Break
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Location: Clarice Smith Center Faculty and Staff Lounge (across the hall from the Cafritz Theatre and up the stairs above the Starbucks)

Barbara Haggh-Huglo, <em>Work Titles for Early Church Music: Chant, Polyphony, Sacred Keyboard Music, and their Manuscripts to 1650</em> Barbara Haggh-Huglo, Work Titles for Early Church Music: Chant, Polyphony, Sacred Keyboard Music, and their Manuscripts to 1650
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As a musicologist who has published on the history of music at cities, courts, and in churches and monasteries, on office chant and on medieval music theory, I regularly use online databases. What I lack is easy access to sources from before 1500 and to notated manuscripts of church music, whether they be liturgical books, choirbooks of choral polyphony, or organ/manuscripts. For me to compile a list of musical sources from a particular city or timeframe or with a distinctive characteristic, such as rotulus or oblong (partbook) format, Hufnagel notation, or being of the genre of ordinal, requires hard-copy books and much effort. If a ‘work title’ as those of RISM, were to include short descriptions of entire sources, even like ‘anonymous compilation of treatises and chant,’ as well as the date and origin or provenance of the source, this would greatly help musicologists researching early modern sacred music. Beyond this, appropriate choices of cataloguing elements would be useful. The problems for early church music are known: much is anonymous, even untitled, and comprised of material ranging from tonaries to distinct offices and/or masses for saints, votive and festal polyphonic ordinaries or ordinaries whose purpose cannot be determined, untitled organ versets, and much more. I propose using several levels of specificity in descriptions, always preferring that including the most material efficiently. Single chants, polyphonic entities, or untitled distinct compositions, should be referred to by their text incipit (Salve regina, Te Deum, Obrecht Missa Maria zart), purpose if possible or necessary (individual mass movements or motets), or genre (untitled [sacred] keyboard work, untitled textless [sacred] vocal monophony), with the place and date of origin of the source if appropriate. Collections, such as chanted offices or masses in monophony or polyphonic mass ordinaries or propers or plenary cycles, should be identified only as such, without naming composite parts, but with the general work title, the destination of the liturgy (name of a city or a particular church, here Abbey of St. Emmeram, or religious order) and text incipits to distinguish offices (Arnold Vohburg, Office of St. Emmeram Sancte Emmeramme). Manuscript collections of compositions should be cited by shelf number and performer destination (vocal, keyboard), at least. Correcting or circumventing major cataloguing errors effectively would also be helpful.

Andrea Copland, Susan Forscher Weiss, and Joseph Montcalmo, <em>Hacking Harmony, Building Literacy, and Engaging Communities</em> Andrea Copland, Susan Forscher Weiss, and Joseph Montcalmo, Hacking Harmony, Building Literacy, and Engaging Communities
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Hackathons are team events organized around solving problems with technology in a short amount of time. These are inherently innovative events, inviting and inspiring participants to bring their best ideas to new projects. This event asked “how can technology help bring music learning in the digital age alive?” For the first time, students from all schools and departments at Johns Hopkins University with a passion for music and technology joined creative forces for a 24-hour sprint to create new instruments and teaching tools for novices and expert musicians alike. Traditionally, hackathons focus on teams of technologists working together to leverage their technical expertise. Peabody music students were invited to partner with students in computer science and engineering from the Homewood Campus in the Arthur Friedheim Library, making space for technology collaboration in the conservatory. The Hackathon included two concert events and five workshops to introduce students to designing electronic instruments, introductions to Max/MSP programming, neural network programming, synthesis, and artificial intelligence in music. In addition to 25 competitors, the workshops and concerts reached nearly 200 people from all JHU schools in Baltimore City. This presentation will share how the project team planned a successful event, considerations for replicating this event on your campus, and ideas for overcoming barriers with musicians who may be interested by unsure of their abilities with technology. Attendees will be invited to share how they can take these ideas back to their own campuses, and will have an opportunity to engage with some of the technology students at Peabody accessed to build musical stairs, music-playing prostheses, and tools to improve performance.

Break and Set Up for Business Meeting
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ATMLA Business Meeting
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ATMLA Social Bike Ride
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Times are estimates. We'll start about a half hour after the end of the business meeting. Meet outside the main entrance of The Clarice. Ride should take 3-4 hours. Probably. More details.